Monthly Archives: May 2009

Miracles and the Ministry of Angels

angeleI was a boy at the time, riding down a hill on my bicycle.  Rounding a bend, I looked up and saw a parked car right in front of me.  All I could do was shut my eyes.  When I opened them again I was the other side, continuing my journey.  I remember thinking at the time: ‘That’s good, I must have gone on the inside’. I knew that there was no way I had gone round it.  Years later, for some reason it came back to mind.  Thinking about it again, I thought: ‘No, I didn’t go round it, there wasn’t room.  In any case I had my eyes shut.’  So how did I get to the other side?

I was recounting this incident in a group one time when a woman spoke up and told us how, when driving along a country road, she was faced with the inevitability of a head-on collision with a lorry.  Nothing happened.  When she looked in her driving mirror the lorry was continuing its journey behind her.

How are we to understand incidents like this?

Bill Bryson says this in ‘A Short History of Nearly Everything’:  ‘The world in which we live is not as solid as it appears.  Everything is made up of atoms that are mostly empty space. The solidity we experience all around us is an illusion. Every atom is made of three kinds of elementary particles: protons that have a positive electrical charge, electrons that have a negative electrical charge; and neutrons which have no charge at all. When two objects come together in the real world – billiard balls are most often used  as an illustration – they don’t actually strike each other.  Rather the negatively charged fields of the two balls repel each other.  Were it not for their electrical charges, they could, like galaxies, pass right through each other unscathed.’

Perhaps an angel turned off the electricity?

Advertisements

Towards Wholeness

Soon after leaving theological college in 1960, the opportunity came to study Clinical Theology under the late Dr Frank Lake, a Christian psychiatrist.  This involved attending seminars over a two-year period.  Dr Lake had developed a model for understanding the development of the human personality called ‘The Womb of the Spirit’ and emphasized the importance of what happened in the first nine months of an individual’s life. We looked at various types of personality and it was not long before I recognized myself as fitting into the schizoid  personality pattern, someone shy and withdrawn who found close relationships difficult.  I was very sensitive and tried to bottle up my feelings.

Following this I was generously given permission to attend a further course at Lingdale that was then the Clinical Theology centre in Nottingham.  We met on alternate weeks from Monday to Friday over a six month period.

We were a small group of clergy, all Anglicans apart from me.  The facilitator of the group was Brian Lake, also a psychiatrist and Frank Lake’s brother. We met together every morning with the same task: share what you are feeling.  Metaphorically speaking, I would hide behind a newspaper and peer out occasionally to see what was going on.

One day my dam broke: floods of tears and the release of incredible inner pain.  When the storm passed, I discovered to my surprise that my colleagues were still there, accepting and supporting me.  It was a most wonderful experience of love and acceptance.

Why was I hurting so much, where did the pain come from?  I began a search to find out.

Not long after this I became aware of the ministry of Wholeness Through Christ, a small charity offering training in prayer ministry through five-day training courses held at various conference centres up and down the country.

Each person attending one of these courses is offered time to explore their own need for healing and discover how the Holy Spirit can bring both healing and release from the effects of past hurts and sins as well as giving us the grace to forgive those who have hurt us.

Over a period of time I attended a number of Wholeness Through Christ courses and was eventually invited to join the team.  I found them very helpful and beneficial but the question that set off my journey towards wholeness was still unanswered.

By now I had come to understand how the Holy Spirit, the revealer of truth, can enable people to recover ‘forgotten’ memory, even the memory of an unborn child.

I went on another course called ‘Journey into Healing’ with the express intention of finding out how I was feeling when my mother was carrying me.

I was encouraged to lie on a mattress, curling up into a foetal position and breath deeply.  I began to experience some very powerful emotions, including murderous rage.

I realized that I could never be what my mother wanted me to be because she was hoping for a little girl.

At last I had found the answer.  My pain stemmed from feeling rejected while still in the womb.  I found that the discovery of the truth set me free, as promised by Jesus (John 8:31-32).

Healing the Memories

Healing the memories

The Psalmist tells us that the Lord is to be found in every situation in which we find ourselves (Psalm 139:7-8).  He is our creator.  The Lord saw what was going on while we were still in our mother’s womb (Psalm 139:15-16).

One of the great discoveries in recent years is the way in which the Lord can heal the wounds of the past.  The following is a brief outline of how this can happen:

  • Pray for the Holy Spirit to show you anything you need to see and understand – perhaps a ‘forgotten’ memory.  He promises to guide us into all truth.  John 16:13
  • Face reality as it was – discover the truth of what happened.  Accept that “what happened, happened to me”.
  • Allow the feelings to surface.  Feel what you felt.  Jesus was with you then and he is with you now.  Psalm 139.  He heals the broken-hearted and binds up their wounds. Psalm 147:3 He is to be found in the place of pain Isaiah 41: 9b-10
  • Mourn the loss of what you did not have.  Mourning is part of the healing process
  • Work through the feelings – anger etc. Jesus allows us “Let Him have it” and vent our rage on him.  “Crucify Him”  we cry.  His response is “Father forgive them”.
  • Choose to forgive the people who hurt you by telling God that you forgive them.  It is not necessary to tell the person himself.  See Mark 11:25.  Ask God to help you if you find it difficult.
  • Recognize any sinful reactions to what happened – anger, resentment, hatred, bitterness etc.
  • Seek release from any negative soul-tie to the person who caused the hurt.
  • Look to Jesus to heal the wound.  There is healing through the Cross.  See Isaiah 53:3,4-6 & 1 Peter 2:24.

Sometimes it is claimed that the ministry of healing the memories is not found in the bible. The answer to this is to be found in John 16:12-13, where Jesus says to his disciples: ‘I have much more to say to you, more than you can now bear. But when He, the Spirit of truth, comes, he will guide you into all truth.’ This is known as progressive revelation.